You Can Be a Safe Driver

When people hear about driving accidents involve teenagers, they’re quick to blame the subjects’ youth. It seems contradictory that society more or less expects people to learn to drive during their teenage years and then turns around and points a finger at them for actually honoring that expectation. Everyone can be a safe driver well before the age of twenty. You just have to keep a few things in mind when you’re actually doing it, since it takes a lot of experience before driving really becomes second nature for you.

teenage driving

For one thing, you need to have the right training when you’re an early driver. People that just learn how to drive from their parents, family members, or their friends probably aren’t going to have the best start on the road. Your parents or friends could be great drivers but they won’t necessarily be great teachers. Plenty of people that are taking driver’s ed are also going to be getting help from their parents, family members, or friends, but that works much better as a supplement. You need to learn about driving laws and road regulations, and it helps to learn things like that in a school environment.

Drinking and driving and texting and driving are also exactly as dangerous as everyone says they are. Some things you hear about driving are just exaggerations: these are not. When you’re texting, your attention is occupied and so are your hands. Your hands need to be on the steering wheel and your eyes need to be on the road, or you’re just not going to be an effective driver. Talking on a cell phone while driving is bad enough, but at least you’ll have more dexterity to work with when you’re doing that. People can also talk on the phone somewhat mindlessly. It’s much harder to do that while texting. If you need to text, you should pull over as soon as possible.

Drinking slows down your reflexes and your reaction time, and it also impairs your judgment. Basically, everything you need in order to drive is going to be affected if you’re drunk at the time. If you’re out drinking, you need a designated driver. If you need to drive somewhere, you just can’t drink. Even if you’re just a little tipsy, you’re better off taking a taxicab home. Getting caught drinking and driving is a serious offense, and it just isn’t worth it.

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The Real Problem with Standardized Testing- Why it is Not Working

Standardized testing is designed to measure the intellectual depth of a student’s learning curve. The tests are administered by their perspective state’s educational institution. The test – at the center of the world’s top leading educators, and education reformers, is centered on the 2002, “No Child Left Behind Act.” The problem is obvious, students are being left in the winds and blown away.

Problems the Test Implemented in the Public School Systems

student testAlthough, the test is aimed at helping students achieve higher learning, it is mistakenly scrutinizing educators and schools. The tests hold public schools on a higher level of performance, which surpassed human comprehension. The stakes and expectations of the standardized testing model are way too high.

The test is really unfair to schools, students and educators. Public schools are funded by performance. Students who do not test well do not pass the test, and schools are deprived of much needed educational funds. It is a system that penalizes the entire educational system, particularly low performing schools.

Test Scores Can’t Possibly Measure Student’s Intellectual Knowledge

studentCertain parts of the test, do not fully capture the vast knowledge students have hidden inside of their minds. There is more to education than choosing the right questions, on multiple choice questions. What makes it even more interesting, is the admission of Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education for the American Research Association.

The admission states that the pressure is on students, teachers, students, and school officials to perform at maximum capacity. With so much pressure to perform, the results are revealed in poor learning environments, low student morale, and high strung educators, all trying to succeed beyond reasonable expectations.

Standardizing Testing Interfere with Classroom Instruction Time

Teachers plan their curriculum, according to their state’s educational requirements. During testing times, educators have to put their lesson plans ahead, and focus on mandated standardized testing. The problem with the testing process goes beyond handing out the tests. Teachers have to spend time preparing the students for the tests, and implement benchmark practice exams, in addition to teaching from the school’s lesson plans.

Summary

Standardized test Overall, the standardized testing systems do little for students and educators in terms of “scoring.” The test isn’t fair for any student, especially students who perceive the tests as being bias. Questions on the test are not geared toward students as a whole, but rather by social- economic status. What’s worse, teachers are not allowed to revise or make adjustments for individual students.

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High School Today

High School TodayHigh school students today face many challenges both mentally and academically. Many more now than just a few years ago. Piling more and more things atop the heads of newly blossoming young adults is only hindering their growth into healthy, stable adults. Students must navigate through the natural obstacles such as puberty and hormonal changes within themselves while also navigating the social changes in their families and schools as they become aware of who they are. Many students during this time, find a way to cope with these immense changes by developing a hobby in the arts or a physical one such as joining a sports team. However, not all students have the ability to do this. Many are forced to grow up too soon in order to keep the family dynamic harmonious. Many students are required to get jobs, keep their grades up, have friends and social lives but be family oriented. Though they must also volunteer and give back to the community while joining as many clubs as they can so they can get into a good college. It’s an added bonus if they can learn three or four languages and cure cancer too. We put so much pressure on teenagers to grow up. We ask them to do the impossible. Things most adults can’t even juggle we expect them to do with a smile. All of these pressures are giving our students mental, physical, and emotional problems they shouldn’t even know about until they’re well into their forties. In which case, can we really blame students for wanting to play video games for a little while on the weekends? If they get a little snappy at six in the morning? If they don’t want to go to Great Great Grandma’s 100th birthday party? I don’t think so. With so much testing, so many projects to do, so many classes to take, they’re beat. We’re pushing them down the path of failure and wondering why they don’t succeed right out of the gates. School is supposed to be fun. It’s supposed to be a place where students can go and learn social skills and things that will prepare them for the future. The real future. Basing their worth off of test scores isn’t the future. Should we be teaching our youth to base their self worth off of numbers? Or should we be teaching them to develop their skills and feel worthy on their own? In high schools all across America, our teenagers are crying out, but their pleas fall on deaf ears.

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